Vangibath Masala Powder

Srilatha Basics, South Indian Leave a Comment

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Vangibath Masala Powder
Vangibaath is a dish from the Indian state of Karnataka. It is a spiced rice dish made primarily with eggplant, and a special spice mix (masala). I learned this recipe from my very first friend in the US, Usha. When my babies were, well, babies, we used to spend a lot of time with Usha and her husband Shivu. They adopted our young family as their own. There was a lot of cooking that happened. As a delicious result, my cooking has been influenced by Usha's karnataka style cooking quite a bit, and I still, after 20+ years, make a lot of dishes I learned from her. This is one of them. This is the masala powder that is added to cooked rice and eggplant/brinjal. I also learned to use this powder with other vegetable+rice combos such as green pepper, and cauliflower. Anyway, this powder, though readily available in most Indian grocery stores, tastes best when made fresh at home, and it doesn't take a long time to make. I make it in small quantities whenever I need, but you can make it in small batches and store in the refrigerator.
Course Main Dish
Cuisine South Indian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Passive Time 10 mins cooling time
Servings
tbsp
Ingredients
  • 2 tbsp Urad dhal
  • 2 tbsp chana dhal/bengal gram
  • 1.5 tbsp coriander seeds/dhania
  • 6 red chilies
  • 4 cloves lavang
  • 1/2 inch piece cinnamon stick
  • 4 pieces marathi moggu I got this from India, omit if you don't have, but try to get some
  • 1 tsp oil to roast the spices
Course Main Dish
Cuisine South Indian
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 5 minutes
Passive Time 10 mins cooling time
Servings
tbsp
Ingredients
  • 2 tbsp Urad dhal
  • 2 tbsp chana dhal/bengal gram
  • 1.5 tbsp coriander seeds/dhania
  • 6 red chilies
  • 4 cloves lavang
  • 1/2 inch piece cinnamon stick
  • 4 pieces marathi moggu I got this from India, omit if you don't have, but try to get some
  • 1 tsp oil to roast the spices
Instructions
  1. Heat the oil in a medium sized pan; gather all the ingredients
  2. When hot, add the cloves, and cinnamon and fry until fragrant
  3. Add the marathi moggu and fry. This spice is hard to find in the US, but I feel adds a wonderful flavor to the dish. Try to get it, if not can be omitted
  4. Remove the spices to a plate to cool
  5. In the same pan, in the remaining oil, add the dals and toast until reddish, taking care not to burn
  6. Add the coriander seeds, and toast for a couple of minutes
  7. Finally switch off the heat, and add the chilies, and toast everything together; remove to plate to cool
  8. When cool, powder and store in a clean dry container until ready to use
Recipe Notes

As in most recipes, I eyeball all of the measures. So adjust the spices to your liking/preference when you make this!

Etymology

I believe Vangi/vangan means eggplant in marathi which is the language spoken in the state of Maharashtra, so I am not sure why a dish from Kannada cuisine would be called Vangi bath. Well whatever its origin, this is one delicious recipe!

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