Green Chili Pickle (Mirchi Achar)

Srilatha Indian, Sides Leave a Comment

This recipe is from our friend Gautam, who dabbles in gardening, cooking, baking, grilling, photography, and on the side, is a neurosurgeon! He grows a bunch of varieties of green chilies including some of the hottest varieties, and like any Indian worth his salt, pickles them. I love this pickle and followed his recipe to make my own from my garden produce, as I was running out of his stock! Eyeballed most of the ingredients.

Falafel, Pita and Yogurt-Tahini Dips: Something fried, something baked, and something cool

Srilatha Middle Eastern/Greek Leave a Comment

It was the summer of ’91. I was fat with my first child. A couple of our friends from our former Indian company were visiting us in Indiana, and the 4 of us decided to go see another couple who worked with us in India, who then lived in St Louis. It was a roughly 300 mile drive, and it was hot, and I felt like a house with a furnace in it, but boy, was it fun! Our friends took us to the airshow in St Louis. It was there that I first had this strange dish. It was masala vadai, but not, wrapped in nan, but of course it wasn’t nan, filled with raita, and what the bloody hell, it was not raita! It was falafel, in spongy soft pita bread, surrounded by gooey labneh/tzatziki! I would have never thought of masal vadai, raita, and naan in the same breath, let alone put it all together in a plate. And yet, it tasted amazing. And today, I made all of them at home for my mahjong group. The pita bread turned out a bit too chewy and tough, so I will post that recipe after I have perfected it and am happy with the results. But following is the recipe for the falafel, and the two dips – tahini dip, and the yogurt sauce which I’ve heard called labneh or tzatziki sauce. Here goes…this lunch was a big hit with my mahjong girls!

Asparagus Curry

Srilatha Sides, South Indian Leave a Comment

I love asparagus! After having tried it as a soup, in pasta, and simply steamed, I was stumped for how else to use it, until a friend Indianised it and made a curry out of it. I don’t remember her exact recipe, but guessed and came up with a version that we love. It’s quick, and doesn’t compromise the tender, juiciness of the asparagus, but just adds a mild spiciness to it. Pairs well with rice as well as rotis.
On another note, is there any vegetable left that we Indians haven’t made a curry, chutney, or a podi out of? 🙂